The intro from “The Vibrations All Around Us”.

What’s the Best Way to Manage a Pesticide-Free Athletic Field?

thebeakerblog:

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Researchers at the University of Connecticut are investigating the feasibility of managing grade school athletic fields without pesticides. It’s science that could one day inform athletic-field management across the nation.

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The intro to the latest episode of The Nose, which talked about whether it was okay or not that Obama played golf after a very serious news conference.

The intro to our show about sociopaths and psychopaths.

thebeakerblog:

Been reading up about honey badgers after watching Honey Badgers: Masters of Mayhem on PBS. Here are some fun facts about one of the most fearless animals in the world:
Their scientific name, mellivora capensis, means “honey eater of the Cape,” referring to their proclivity for raiding bee hives in the area where they were first described, The Cape of Good Hope, South Africa.
They’ve been known to confront lions and hyenas (see: Honey Badger is Bad Ass)
It’s not a badger. They are more closely related to weasels. 
The animals are listed on the IUCN Red List as “Least Concern,” but their nocturnal habits make them hard to study.
They’re remarkably intelligent, capable of sophisticated tool use and planning.
They have a special ability to sleep off snake bites and awake unharmed, which isn’t widely understood.

thebeakerblog:

Been reading up about honey badgers after watching Honey Badgers: Masters of Mayhem on PBS. Here are some fun facts about one of the most fearless animals in the world:

  • Their scientific name, mellivora capensis, means “honey eater of the Cape,” referring to their proclivity for raiding bee hives in the area where they were first described, The Cape of Good Hope, South Africa.
  • They’ve been known to confront lions and hyenas (see: Honey Badger is Bad Ass)
  • It’s not a badger. They are more closely related to weasels. 
  • The animals are listed on the IUCN Red List as “Least Concern,” but their nocturnal habits make them hard to study.
  • They’re remarkably intelligent, capable of sophisticated tool use and planning.
  • They have a special ability to sleep off snake bites and awake unharmed, which isn’t widely understood.

The intro to The Nose, where we talk about the monkey selfie, with bonus last word!

"One of the privileges of making radio is that we have a professional excuse to talk with strangers. It’s like an EZ Pass to intimacy."

Radio producer Ann Hepperman on transom.org (via wnycradiolab)

The intro from “The Scramble: Diversity, Death, and Relatability”, with bonus last word!

New Hampshire Public Radio will be playing Wolfie’s postcard from her visit to Solair Family Nudist Resort in Woodstock, Connecticut. Miss it the first time? Here you go!
Here’s the full show we did on nudism: http://www.yourpublicmedia.org/content/wnpr/exposing-naked-body